Miriti’s Ksh720,000 Per Month Plan From Pawpaw Farming in Meru Starts Paying Off

pawpaw farming in Meru, Kenya
Pawpaw farming in Meru: Photo by PHOEBE OKALL

A careful observation of the pawpaw farming business in Meru, Eastern Kenya, is what triggered a curious study of the crop by one former chemist Howard Miriti. He had observed that middle-men constantly combed the villages in the rather dry part of the country buying pawpaw fruits from small scale farmers.

This trend made him realize that there must be a lucrative business in selling the fruits so he decided to test the waters. He started by planting 1,000 trees of the Solo sp variety. His choice of variety was largely influenced by the market demand and previous experience of the farmers in his region. During his research, he had discovered that the buyers preferred the solo and mountain pawpaw, both of which were performing very well in the warm Igembe climate.  

Pawpaws in Meru mature within 9 months
He had also been told that the solo sp pawpaw variety matures within 9 months and true to it, he made his first harvest in December having sown his seeds in March. At the time Enterprise was interviewing him, he was in his third week of harvesting and he was getting 500 to 600 kg per week.



“The pawpaw trees will get to their optimum production in April. From then, I expect to harvest at least a kilo from each tree per week. This kind of harvest will continue for the next two years before productivity starts declining,” he said.

A pawpaw tree gives 1 kilo per week
Having observed the success of the first crop, Miriti rolled out the project on a 6 acre land planting over 6000 trees in total. He has a target: he estimates that upon maturity, each of the trees would give him 1kg every week, which adds up to a total of 6,000kg from the entire farm.

Miriti, like the other farmers in his area, sells the fruits to the middle-men at a price of Ksh30 per kg.

“I don’t have the time to look for a market for my pawpaw so I sell to buyers who are always here searching for the fruits,” he says and adds, “So far, 3 serious buyers have come to my farm, assessed the fruits and are now competing to buy them.”

If all his plans turn out as envisioned, it means he will be selling 24 tons of pawpaw every month making a turnover of ksh720,000.

What will be his Profit?
Miriti says that pawpaw farming in Meru is not labour intensive: the main activities at the farm are weeding and irrigation. However, he has a unique challenge at the farm – baboons from the neighboring Meru National Park. Because of this, his workers have to wake up at dawn to start patrolling the farm before the primates make their loot.

He now employs 6 labourers and a manager who has previous experience in pawpaw farming. He pays the 6 labourers Ksh6,000 each while the manager is paid Ksh15,000 per month. He also spends approximately Ksh24,000 per week on fuel for pumping water to irrigate the 6 acre farm.

We did a calculation and approximated his expenses at about Ksh147,000 per month. Of course it is higher than that because he did not factor in occasional pest control and other miscellaneous expenses. However, he certainly will make something in the rage of Ksh500,000 in monthly profit if his plan goes as anticipated.

papaya farming guide kenya pdf
Pawpaw farming guide for Kenya
Pawpaw farming is one of the most profitable agribusiness projects in Kenya. We have collected our experiences and information on it and compiled this comprehensive guide. We also constantly edit it to match the changing realities on the ground. 

If you would want to invest in it, we would love to guide you through. Reach us on 0724698357.

You can also get this comprehensive pawpaw farming guide that will guide you right from planting of the seeds through the growth period to harvesting and marketing.

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1 comment :

Unknown said...

This is wonderful job Mzee keep it up